A blog dedicated to Yoko Ono.

By Cara (thecurvature)

See also:
Fuck Yeah John & Yoko

Please Note: All images posted on this blog have been found and collected from the internet and are presented as visual inspiration for those viewing. These images are not presented as my own work, unless I note it under the specific post. Copyright still belongs to the owner / creator of each work. I don’t have any financial benefit from posting them.

If you are a copyright holder who would like an image removed (or if you want to share something for me to post!), email me at doublefantasy AT gmail DOT com.


15th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Brynna Holly with 25 notes

yokos-my-favorite-beatle:

Yoko and her second husband Tony Cox performing Bag Piece at Tokyo’s Sogetsu Art Center in 1964. One of Yoko’s inspirations for bagism was the children’s book Le Petit Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. In the story, a wise fox tells the prince that in order to understand the world, we have to look beneath the surface. "One sees clearly only with the heart. Anything essential is invisible to the eyes."
Photo by Yasuhiro Yoshioka, courtesy of Yoko Ono.

yokos-my-favorite-beatle:

Yoko and her second husband Tony Cox performing Bag Piece at Tokyo’s Sogetsu Art Center in 1964. One of Yoko’s inspirations for bagism was the children’s book Le Petit Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. In the story, a wise fox tells the prince that in order to understand the world, we have to look beneath the surface. "One sees clearly only with the heart. Anything essential is invisible to the eyes."

Photo by Yasuhiro Yoshioka, courtesy of Yoko Ono.

Tagged: yoko onotony coxbag piece1964artperformancetokyo1960sreblog

14th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Brynna Holly with 26 notes

yokos-my-favorite-beatle:

March 10th, 1967.
In response to the ban on Film No. 4, commonly known as Bottoms, Yoko, puzzled by all the fuss, told a reporter: “It’s quite harmless. There’s no murder or violence in it. Why shouldn’t it be given a certificate?”
She was mistaken for being twenty-five years old at the time, when in reality, she was actually thirty-four. 
Photo courtesy of Yoko Ono.

yokos-my-favorite-beatle:

March 10th, 1967.

In response to the ban on Film No. 4, commonly known as Bottoms, Yoko, puzzled by all the fuss, told a reporter: “It’s quite harmless. There’s no murder or violence in it. Why shouldn’t it be given a certificate?”

She was mistaken for being twenty-five years old at the time, when in reality, she was actually thirty-four. 

Photo courtesy of Yoko Ono.

Tagged: yoko onotony cox1967bottomsfilm no. 4artfilm1960slondonreblog

9th April 2014

Link with 5 notes

The Guardian: Hans Ulrich Obrist: the art of curation →

When I do a show, I’m hands on. I almost do the whole thing myself. Over the course of my career I’ve been lucky to work with many creative curators. Their role is to give me protection and encouragement. Not in the sense of changing what I do, but allowing me to do what I want to do. They have helped me to understand what I like.

Alexandra Monroe gave so much love to me and my work that she made YES [Ono’s first major retrospective] very easy for me. I would sometimes wonder why she would select a particular work – but she says: “Look at this – it’s important, Yoko.” And she is often right.

Jon Hendricks [curator of Ono’s current Bilbao show] has also been very supportive – just by going to places on my behalf and saying: “Yoko doesn’t like that.”

Hans Ulrich is one of those people who jump around a lot. He flies around in his mind, just as he is always flying around the world. And when you meet that mind in transit it’s very exciting. It gives me a sense of my own power. My feeling is that Hans is not just a curator. His duty is to nurture his own knowledge and tastes as much as the artists he works with.

Tagged: yoko onowriting2014arthans ulrich obristalexandra monroelink

2nd April 2014

Audio post with 2 notes

SFMOMA has a rich history of inviting artists, curators, and scholars to participate in live programming. This recording is the first release in a new series from SFMOMA’s Public Programs Archive. Each week we will publish an artist talk, scholarly lecture, or panel discussion that has not been heard since the event was recorded. In honor of Yoko Ono’s birthday on February 18, we’re kicking off the series with a recording of “An Afternoon with Yoko Ono,” originally presented in SFMOMA’s Phyllis Wattis Theater on June 22, 2002. Organized in conjunction with the exhibition YES YOKO ONO, this program features a conversation between Ono and Paul Schimmel, former chief curator of the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art; a musical performance by Ono with a guest appearance by her son, Sean Lennon; and a question and answer segment with the audience.

SFMOMA’s Public Programs Archive: https://soundcloud.com/tags/public%20programs%20archive

Thanks to Dana for the link.

Tagged: yoko onointerviewart2002audio

Source: SoundCloud / SFMOMA

13th March 2014

Photo with 16 notes

Tagged: yoko onosky piece to jesus christ19651960sartperformanceinstructionscarnegie recital hallnyc

Source: frieze.com

5th March 2014

Photo reblogged from Zig Zag Wanderer with 67 notes

Tagged: yoko ono1960sartperformancereblog

3rd March 2014

Photo reblogged from j'ai oublié with 25 notes

Tagged: yoko onola monte young1960sfluxusartperformancesky piece to jesus christ1965carnegie recital hallreblog

19th February 2014

Photo reblogged from overthinking with 52 notes

Yoko with Imagine Peace Map, November 2013

Yoko with Imagine Peace Map, November 2013

Tagged: yoko ono2013installationartinstructionsexhibitionimagine peace mapreblog

18th February 2014

Photo reblogged from RAY JOHNSON ESTATE with 98 notes

rayjohnsonestate:

"Dear Marcia,
I enclose Yoko Ono’s lock of hair…”

rayjohnsonestate:

"Dear Marcia,

I enclose Yoko Ono’s lock of hair…”

Tagged: yoko onoray johnsonartfluxus1970reblog

24th January 2014

Photo reblogged from Nothing else matters. with 20 notes

trippingoverthinair:

#me (at Museum of Contemporary Art)

trippingoverthinair:

#me (at Museum of Contemporary Art)

Tagged: yoko onoartexhibition2014sydneyreblog